Tenney Mountain Proposes Hotel, Condos, Other Base Area Deveopments

Tenney Mountain Presents Development Plans to Plymouth Planning Board

The ownership plans to reopen the ski area in the next few weeks and hopes start construction on a hotel as soon as this spring.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018, NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com


Tenney Mountain will open for skiing this winter and hopes to start construction on an 80 unit hotel as soon as this summer, according to a presentation made to the Plymouth Planning Board last week. Tenney Mountain Development Group representative Bruce Cunningham made the non-binding conceptual presentation, outlining a 5 to 8 year project build-out, "assuming that the economy stays very strong."

Outlining plans for the 2017-18 ski season, Cunningham stated Tenney had "gone through recertifications of the lifts" and "will be open and operating worst case scenario the second week of February."

After reopening the ski area, Cunningham stated Tenney Mountain Development Group plans to develop an 80 unit condominium hotel, 90 adjacent townhomes, an 84 unit senior living community, a 120 unit townhome community, and a retail plaza. In addition, plans call for apartments, labs, and study halls as part of an expansion of Plymouth State University. Overall, approximately 335 total living spaces are proposed.

Beyond the residential developments, Tenney plans to tap an aquifer to sell bulk water in 4 by 4 by 4 totes, possibly for military and corporate use. Non-skiing activities at Tenney could include a natural climbing wall, a zip line, and paths for walking, jogging, and biking.

According to Cunningham, "the priority to move forward with would be the hotel. Bringing in the funds for the hotel, bringing in the operator, and getting the hotel built, as fast as possible. Assuming the mountain is open, and it will be, and it will be fully operated this year so that it will be ready to go next year. So that would take place, literally if we had the permits, we'd start this summer, this spring."

"Simultaneously, that retail plaza would be something that they'd want to install right off the bat. And then, we'd be tackling the senior living."

According to Cunningham, "the mountain is privately funded" by Managing Business Partner Alessandro Insolia's company and "they have over three and a half million dollars into it and they're dedicated to getting the rest of the mountain open and operating."

According to Tenney's Facebook posts, the Hornet chairlift is "100% complete." In recent weeks, Tenney has taken delivery of a modern snowcat, an HKD fan gun, and has been renovating the base lodge.

Located just outside of Plymouth, New Hampshire, Tenney Mountain ski area first opened in 1960. After repeated struggles in recent decades, the 1,400 vertical foot ski area closed in 2010. Bouchard's Tenney Mountain Development Group acquired the property in November of 2014.

http://www.newenglandskiindustry.com/viewstory.php?storyid=651
- Sam

Comments

  • Those jogging paths should bring in a lot of revenue for the investment. 8-|
  • Is it April Fools Day already?  Where did the winter go??
  • newman said:

    Those jogging paths should bring in a lot of revenue for the investment. 8-|

    yeah... 'jogging' isn't exactly what serious runners do. They missed a marketing term there..
  • I’ve been watching Mike’s (the owner) videos. The Hornet (haul
    rope) passed inspection and they’ve been putting chairs back on. He was
    shooting for an end of January opening. It is good to develop year-round use,
    but the basics (skiing and riding) need to get going.

  • I get the feeling that "non-binding" is the most important phrase in that presentation. But, good luck to them, to Tenney Mountain and to the Red Sox.
  • edited January 25

    "assuming that the economy stays very strong." 

    well we all know what happens when you do that
    :-O


    Brings to mind the old Sinatra song "High Hopes."   

    Who knows?  Maybe I'll retire to that senior housing in the not too distant future.  That's my non-binding conceptual plan!

  • When and if Tenney gets up and running again, they should get on board with Magic and Bolton and the Freedom Pass crew.

    Alex

    Lake Hopatcong, NJ
  • I'd hyper-focus on creating an amazing skiing product and then gauge whether (or not) this is feasible to make real estate developments, later.  A "hotel" is not the right real estate choice at this time.  
  • This may be the first slope side assisted living facility in the country! Florida, Smarida I say.
  • I'd feel awful if I had to live in an assisted-living facility and look up at ski slopes I couldn't use.
  • I'm sure he's serious about doing this, but it's a huge tease to the community to promise this stuff only to ultimately come up short.  Hopefully the part about the ski area opening actually happens this time.
  • "Hey Honey, kids, I looked into the options, so why don't we spend our vacation at Tenney Mountain?"

    Somehow I have a hard time seeing that statement ever being made by anyone, anywhere.
  • "Hey Honey, kids, I looked into the options, so why don't we spend our vacation at Tenney Mountain?"

    Somehow I have a hard time seeing that statement ever being made by anyone, anywhere.

    Not that I disagree, the same could have been said for Sunday River 25 years ago, pre LBO.

    Or Park West (Canyons/PCVail)

    People go to much smaller areas in PA and western NY for vacations as well.

    Just sayin'

    I wish them luck but it's a tough road.
  • If Tenney can offer a solid product for the right market at the right price point I can see them being successful. 

    Look at King Pine, they are very successful with a very small skiing venue.  King Pine has found their niche and attracts a lot of families who come and stay on site for weekends and vacation weeks.  If there was a way to track how many kids have learned to ski at each ski area I'd bet that King Pine would be pretty high on that list.
  • As for the hotel going in right away, I spent a overnight in Plymouth once while skiing 93. The town could use more beds. Coming from Cannon and going to WV the next day, I did slot of driving to find a room. I could of went to Lincoln, but I was afraid of what it would cost. At least Plymouth has a big Wal Mart. The senior living can bus the folks twice a week to get adult diapers.
  • newman said:

    As for the hotel going in right away, I spent a overnight in Plymouth once while skiing 93. The town could use more beds. Coming from Cannon and going to WV the next day, I did slot of driving to find a room. I could of went to Lincoln, but I was afraid of what it would cost. At least Plymouth has a big Wal Mart. The senior living can bus the folks twice a week to get adult diapers.

    I am not convinced that Plymouth needs more beds. They just built a Fairfield on Tenney Mountain Highway. That had to take a bite out of demand. Also in town is Common Man Inn, Days Inn, Econo Lodge, and a few no names along with a Comfort Inn in Ashland. 

    How many people really want/need to lodge in Plymouth? I think most people would want to lodge closer to their destination. Even for those that are just passing through, are they really going to want to drive 10-12 minutes off the highway and pay slopeside/resort lodging prices at Tenney?

    The attractions in the area are primarily further north or closer to the Lakes. Plymouth is kinda in the middle sanwiched between the Whites and the Lakes. Polar Caves and climbing in Rumney are about it for local attractions, otherwise most folks would lodge closer to their destinations. Without the University, there would be even less demand for lodging in town. 

    If these pie in the sky plans actually work out, maybe demand could be created by a fully built out Tenney. I just don't see it happening. The history of the area speaks volumes. If the ski area really mattered as anything besides a focal point or loss leader, they should be looking at Big Squaw for inspiration. Obviously, that isn't the case.
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