Backyard syndrome, do you get it?

With 60° temperatures and 3 inches of rain and all the snow melting in my yard it is such a dreary sight to see.

A lot has got to change to make me want to get out to go north to ski again,such a letdown for mid to late February .

I remember a college ski trip to Sugarbush Vermont and it was down pouring in March and I was the only one out skiing in it and I have skied maybe a handful of other times in the rain but it just gets me down.

How does back Yard syndrome affect you and your attitude towards making a trip to ski again ?
( I know Joshua you live slopeside so you can pick and choose any day anytime to get out there walking out the door but for most of us it requires a journey to ski a decent hill)

Comments

  • I don't feel like I live in "Ski Country" therefore whats in the backyard here has little affect on my desire to ski.  Camelback is of course dependent on man-made snow and there are countless times (most recently last Saturday) when the only snow around is on the trails.  Snow in my actual backyard (not my skiing backyard like the challange) is of little consequence and more of a hassel then a help.  I actually love it out west, like Colorado and Utah, when you can ski up in the mountains on great snow and return down to the valleys in 70 degree weather.  The older I get the less I enjoy the cold.

    However, still being mostly an eastern skier I do follow the weather quite closely up in New England and that probably affects my mood more then anything.  This upcoming weekend is a perfect example as it may be another washout which makes me not so much of a happy camper.  My mood is tempered somewhat however, watching it snow out west and knowing that in 2 weeks I'll be out there.

    Alex

    Lake Hopatcong, NJ
  • Doesn't matter what my yard looks like to me or what time of year it is. Obviously I have more of a desire to ski on a day with fresh snow.
    - Sam
  • This is why web cams are a great thing
  • I get it. 5" Saturday and I skied in my backyard yesterday and now it is all gone except a couple plow piles.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • Almost 70 degrees and sunny in my backyard in Mass. 50 and pouring rain in Lincoln, NH. So the backyard effect is influencing me big time. I'll probably skip the drive North on Friday and opt for work and/or housework down south instead
  • I see this as a legit thing with non-regular skiers. I was told yesterday at work that all the snow on the slopes would be gone today and I had to hold myself back. I was about to go off about snowmaking, but decided to not say anything. I find it hard to believe that a fellow Vermonter could be ignorant enough to not know the energy intensiveness of a ski resort to provide risk mitigation during a blowtorch event.
  • Even with snowmaking a common word in the northeast, people get hyped when snow is in the yard. Here is two examples of how people can think when your yard is bare.
    My mom would say on a cold night in October, if this keeps up they will be making snow.
    My dad would say on a warm Feb. day, there is no skiing today. I would say, dad they have snowmaking. He would reply, I know they make their own snow, but they need natural snow for a base!
  • For me its about investigating the ski area's conditions to see if its worth it. If it means driving 2 hours+, spending $50-$100 on a ticket, gas money, food money, etc - it has to be worth it. Only so much financial resources and spending $$ on a marginal or worse day is a big cost to eat. If I'm already in the area, or have a free ticket, or its my only chance to ski there, that edges it into being still worth it.

    But I'm lucky in that my days off at work are spread out, so that I have a midweek day off each week and work every other weekend, and have several night skiing opportunities close by, so I can be more finicky when picking a ski day.
  • 5" of snow here on Saturday, 67F yesterday, 74F today and possibly snow tomorrow.

    Ski Conditions Report: A detailed report describing the snow conditions on the mountain the day of your visit. Skiers should become familiar with the following snow surface descriptions: Ice: Packed Powder, Slush: Packed Powder, Frozen Granular: Packed Powder , Packed Powder - A thin covering of snow over bare earth.

  • edited February 21
    Close enough to Ragged that the weather is often roughly the same.  Can get a pretty good idea of surface conditions outside of groomed runs by looking out the window.  Of course there's always groomers available as long as the area is open.
  • 1/2" of snow here today, 3" at the summit of Mt Snow with TTB snowmaking.

    Ski Conditions Report: A detailed report describing the snow conditions on the mountain the day of your visit. Skiers should become familiar with the following snow surface descriptions: Ice: Packed Powder, Slush: Packed Powder, Frozen Granular: Packed Powder , Packed Powder - A thin covering of snow over bare earth.

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