1 Billion dollars

I know this is a big issue and we've all been around long enough to say "Remember the winter of..." when it comes to snow, winter and what it "used to be like." This article is scary. I am wondering what all of our home areas are doing to deal with this big change because it's certainly not going away anytime soon. 

"Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
Greg Stump

Comments

  • High-efficiency snow guns to make more when the weather allows and to recover quickly from meltdowns

    Developing weather-proof (indoor) amenities/activities

    Very ugly scenario

  • While not glamorous, or high profile, the article mentions Heavenly Lake Tahoe is going to remove rocks and stumps that hinder their ability to open with a low snowpack. Mad River Glen and Bromley have been doing this for a long time, and it allows them to open sooner with less. I think more areas need to take this route more seriously, at least on some of their major routes. If they can landscape them similar to a golf course with a thick low turf, they can open with a few inches.  
  • edited February 23
    White
    NJSki said:

    While not glamorous, or high profile, the article mentions Heavenly Lake Tahoe is going to remove rocks and stumps that hinder their ability to open with a low snowpack. Mad River Glen and Bromley have been doing this for a long time, and it allows them to open sooner with less. I think more areas need to take this route more seriously, at least on some of their major routes. If they can landscape them similar to a golf course with a thick low turf, they can open with a few inches.  

    The local environmental people hate this. I don't know why they didn't do this from the start. Snowmaking may need to be a big factor for the western resorts more than they want. If the west has a snowmaking building boom like the east in the 80s, at least the new stuff will be less of a unknown risk. Technology has made things less of a headache then what was dealt with in years past.

  • newman said:


    NJSki said:

     Snowmaking may need to be a big factor for the western resorts more than they want. If the west has a snowmaking building boom like the east in the 80s, at least the new stuff will be less of a unknown risk. Technology has made things less of a headache then what was dealt with in years past.

    Snowmaking in the west has other problems. Water is scarce in many places and water rights are a big issue out west. Even if you own the land in many cases you do not own the water rights and cannot even take water off of your own land. In most cases out west the ski areas lease the land from the federal government and the farmers would not stand for ski areas taking water from their farms or cattle.
  • I agree with what you say. I just wonder how the water issues could somehow come to a happy medium. The ski areas bring in tourist dollars and support jobs. The locals know this, but it's a issue as mentioned, for snowmaking water. I hope people realize you may need to keep resorts in business for the areas good. I well understand that farms need water from the local supplies. However, I do think ski areas could find a way to build a watershed for snowmaking or come up with a plan for local water use. Sugarbush went through something on those lines. I know it's still a different animal out there.
  • Bromley is highlighted in this great read of development of ski resorts in Vermont in the mid-century:

  • What about recycling the water? Capture the run off into ponds  more efficiently in the spring or even (I know it's gross) recycling grey water? 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • arizona snow bowl uses grey water. Not gross. Ultimately all water is or has been grey water to some extent at some time. Drink up! ;)

  • arizona snow bowl uses grey water. Not gross. Ultimately all water is or has been grey water to some extent at some time. Drink up! ;)

    Killington uses gray water in the toilets (but, they claim,  not in the snowmaking.  The motto of the ski industry could evolve to "where the affluent meet the effluent".
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