Mad River Glen's "Ski it if you can" - How do you interpret?

Just thinking about their slogan - how do you interpret it?

1. Ski it if you can - the trails are tough, and you can only ski it if you have the ability to do so.
2. Ski it if you can - you must check this area out! You have to ski it if you can get the chance.

I used to think it was more based on #1 - but I like #2 better.

Thoughts?

JD
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Comments

  • edited March 18
    1 . Always saw stickers on towers at other areas.
  • Ski it when you can, limited snowmaking. Moss, Rocks and Grass.

    Ski Conditions Report: A detailed report describing the snow conditions on the mountain the day of your visit. Skiers should become familiar with the following snow surface descriptions: Ice: Packed Powder, Slush: Packed Powder, Frozen Granular: Packed Powder , Packed Powder - A thin covering of snow over bare earth.

  • I've never considered anything other than option #1. But now that you mention it option #2 also makes sense and is a lot more friendly.
    MRG was my go-to place in the 80's. I wore the "ski it if you can" motto as a badge of honor thinking that it made me better/cooler than others. Now that I'm older that seems stupid. So I hope it's option #2.
    It doesn't end up mattering to me because even though I ski, their snowboarding ban keeps me away. And unfortunately the snowboarding ban is pretty solid evidence that it's always been option #1.
  • I agree with you-- the first seems challenging to the skier of advanced abilities but they've really been touting their whole beginner program there as well. Love their vibe apre's ski as well--- everyone gathers in the basebox area to hang out, have a beer or so while the kids play outside doing things that kids used to do. 

    Here's an interesting take on the whole snowboarding thing at MRG. It would've pissed me off too. 

    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • I see it as a fun turn of phrase, incorporating the positive elements of "ski it if you get the chance" and "ski it if you are able to face the challenge" (though a lot of the mountain is very novice-friendly under most conditions). I think it predates the snowboard ban, in which case the jab at snowboards would be unintentional but funny.

    If you ever ski MRG before or after the season, you will likely see as many snowboarders as skiers, at leas that has been my experience hiking it 4-5 times in the recent past before and after lifts run for the season.
  • I think nowadays it means option #2.  With groomed routes from each lift, clearly #2.  And, not only can everybody ski it -- everybody is welcome, you just have to bring skis.

    "Don't smoke on airplanes" doesn't mean that you aren't welcome aboard.  

  • Before the dawn of snowboards, I always took it as a challenge, but that was then there was a lot more snow. A fellow Norwich guy and I would always take off reading day and go ski instead. One year it was at Sugarbush and the next it was at MRG-- and in December we had the full area open with great bumps and snow-- and I have the photos to prove it. The winters of 85-86, 86-87 and 87-88 were epic in Vermont so MRG was always good to go. Norwich spun from Xmas through spring break--- that was my work study job (rough, I know!). 88-89 we had virtually no winter so a classmate changed his bumper sticker to "Ski it if you can (find snow). 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • A  revisionist outlook: Ski it if you can ('cause you can't board it)
  • I'm a longtime snowboarder and joke about calling it "Ski it if you're Ken" (Barbie doll comparison). I have nothing but respect for the coop. 
  • This may be a new topic, but I am seeing fewer and fewer snowboarders and telemark skiers. Does anyone else notice this? 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • Yes on snowboarders for sure.  Haven't notice a decrease in teles, I probably would since I'm often on them myself.

    Always thought "Ski it if you can" was related to the difficulty of the mountain, I remember they were also advertising "You can ski it" at one point to counter that.
  • I've noticed both. 

     I think tele is losing out to the AT stuff.  My understanding is the tele binding forces the ski to submarine a bit on the uphill slog, which makes the AT faster and more efficient.  That's what I'm told.  Seems to me the AT set ups have gotten much better over the years.

    Have long believed that there is a percentage of the population that are naturally born/prone to snowboard.  I think during the 2000s snowboards were oversold.  

    Kind of like if the office supply store sold left handed scissors to right handed people, just because left handed scissors were suddenly in vogue.    Eventually it would correct.    I think we're seeing a slow but sure correction, and eventually the snowboarders will be a small segment,  those whose brains and bodies are truly wired for snowboarding. 

    Seems to me the ability to snowboard well is a rare gift.  I think the bozos at Keystone and the cussing kids at the MRG supermarket reflect badly on those who have the real talent.  And it was really pissing me off when Mr. Burton was encouraging the bad behavior with his bozo bounty for trespassing.  He set his own sport back a few years with that stupidity.
      


  • I had a good conversation with a man who is just a few years older than me. He was a snowboarder but got out of wintersports entirely after boarding since the early 90's. The reason why? Nothing was being marketed to him at all. Here he was, a man flush with disposable income shopping for a new board and they were all being marketed to the younger, more arrogant crowd. It was the year of the S & M and Playboy boards so there was really nothing for him. He talked to several other boarders of his age and they felt the same. They were grown ups who wanted to continue but there wasn't anything remotely designed for their use and there was no way he was going to buy a boar with graphics that he found either inappropriate or too radical for his 40+ something style. When he emailed Burton they didn't even bother to respond. 

    I heard this from some shop owners as well-- all subjective of course but they've told me that they'd have some guy my age come in looking for new gear and leave empty handed. Maybe it's gotten better-- I dunno, but I know Roy hasn't been out for a while. 

    Agree with you about Burton and those clowns. There's rebellion and then there's just being a jerk. 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • edited March 19
    I think I see more people working to learn tele than actually doing real tele!  (former tele and alpine skier that I am   :)   )

    Also see fewer "older" snowboarders.  Now middle aged (HAHAHA), I'm the oldest female rider I EVER see!!!   And fewer younger ones - mostly they just rip straight down the slopes and go to the park.   I enjoy turns/switch/reverse/etc depending on the contours of the hill/glade.  Same with my split boards.  And I can turn my splitboard in ski mode  :)

    re:  marketing of boards - boards are WAY easier to buy/put on bindings from the internet - I have never bought from a shop.    Anybody can figure out how to put the bindings on and change the angles whenever you need to, also.   

    meh to "ski it if you can" - i am probably a better snowboarder than most skiers I see   :)   they can keep their ski area for themselves - I don't like to deal with snobby skiers anyway   :)
  • It is probably now a mix of the two, along with the ski/snowboard reference.

    Fun little story. I rode the Sunnyside with a guy that was a frequent skier there but not a die hard. 

    His take; 
    "This is this is the place you go to find out how well you don't ski."
    You ski because even if you don't do it well, it's still a blast....
  • Is Deer Valley still boarderless? Who besides MRG?
  • edited March 20
    ciscokid said:

    Is Deer Valley still boarderless? Who besides MRG?

    Only MRG at this time is "snowboard free". Edited: I thought Alta and Deer Valley changed their policy.  But apparently, I was wrong.
  • Alta is too right?
  • ciscokid said:

    Is Deer Valley still boarderless? Who besides MRG?

    Only MRG at this time is "snowboard free".
    Deer Valley is snowboard free according to their website.
    - Sam
  • ciscokid said:

    Is Deer Valley still boarderless? Who besides MRG?

    Deer Valley, MRG, Alta.

    As far as "older" snowboarders go:   My wife and I are both 48 and snowboard.  

    As far as nothing being marketed towards older snowboarders I disagree. There is plenty of "young obnoxious" stuff in both snowboarding and skiing.  But there is also plenty of stuff that's plenty appealing for someone my age. Brands like Arbor, Never Summer, Jones, etc are making  boards that have either very subdued or very beautiful graphics.  

    As far as Burton not even responding.  Yes, Burton probably has the worst customer service of anyone in any industry.

    As far as the "obnoxiousness" thing goes: There's plenty of that to go around in all sports.  But for snowboarding I feel like it generally all stemmed from snowboarding have a cross-over culture with skateboarding.  Which is why parks became a thing concurrent with snowboarding becoming popular.  Meanwhile there was a completely separate branch of snowboarding taking off that was all about powder and not about the park.  30 years later and you still find plenty of obnoxious boarders and skiers in the parks, while the other branch of snowboarders is having too much fun in the woods to bother anyone.

    As far as the MRG snowboarding ban goes, it's a very effective niche-marketing technique.  They don't have the resources to go head to head with their neighboring ski areas.  So instead they offer a unique experience.  It's smart and it works. 
  • Snowboarding is losing to twin-tipped skis. You can do all the tricks and hit the park in style without being tied to a plank.

    One thing that bothers me about snowboards is the fact that half the time they are not looking the way they are turning/facing (heelside turn). Always struck me as unsafe.

    That being said, I have respect for those who are good snowboarders- watching some of the long-time riders shred Rumble is pretty impressive...
  • edited March 19
    becca_m said:

    meh to "ski it if you can" - i am probably a better snowboarder than most skiers I see   :)   they can keep their ski area for themselves - I don't like to deal with snobby skiers anyway   :)
    Curious about the split board -- as a skier (and former snurfer)  I hope you take on the appropriately snobby attitude when you split it!   ;)  :D ;) ;)

  • MRG snobby? Huh? Pretty much as far from that as you can get, but anyway. Crunchy, throwback, old-school, eure, but snobby is a stretch.
  • edited March 20

    MRG snobby? Huh? Pretty much as far from that as you can get, but anyway. Crunchy, throwback, old-school, eure, but snobby is a stretch.

    Mmmmmm, not so much.  MRG reminds me of many parts of CO and CA.  Lot's of intense Type-A Northeasterners trying to convince you how crunchy, throwback, old-school, laid-back they are.  The facade is pretty thin and cracks easily. 
  • MRG snobby? Huh? Pretty much as far from that as you can get, but anyway. Crunchy, throwback, old-school, eure, but snobby is a stretch.

    Mmmmmm, not so much.  MRG reminds me of many parts of CO and CA.  Lot's of intense Type-A Northeasterners trying to convince you how crunchy, throwback, old-school, laid-back they are.  The facade is pretty thin and cracks easily. 
    Maybe, but hardly snobby... pretentious, sure, but hardly snobby.
  • MRG snobby? Huh? Pretty much as far from that as you can get, but anyway. Crunchy, throwback, old-school, eure, but snobby is a stretch.

    Mmmmmm, not so much.  MRG reminds me of many parts of CO and CA.  Lot's of intense Type-A Northeasterners trying to convince you how crunchy, throwback, old-school, laid-back they are.  The facade is pretty thin and cracks easily. 
    Maybe, but hardly snobby... pretentious, sure, but hardly snobby.
    Well played sir, well played.  
  • MRG snobby? Huh? Pretty much as far from that as you can get, but anyway. Crunchy, throwback, old-school, eure, but snobby is a stretch.

    Mmmmmm, not so much.  MRG reminds me of many parts of CO and CA.  Lot's of intense Type-A Northeasterners trying to convince you how crunchy, throwback, old-school, laid-back they are.  The facade is pretty thin and cracks easily. 
    Maybe, but hardly snobby... pretentious, sure, but hardly snobby.
    Well played sir, well played.  
    Why, thank you! Need to get shut eye...tomorrow will be another keeper- bluebird skies and mid-winter snow. Yummy
  • Snowboarding is losing to twin-tipped skis. You can do all the tricks and hit the park in style without being tied to a plank.

    I agree. I've heard of a lot of snowboarders switching to skis. They see the skiers in the park doing better tricks, getting higher out of the half-pipe and on the jumps, and they say, "Hey. I think I'll try switching to skis."
    Let's face it. Skis just do everything better. No snowboarder is going to beat a skier down a slalom, GS, downhill course, or a mogul run. Four edges are better than two.

    One thing that bothers me about snowboards is the fact that half the time they are not looking the way they are turning/facing (heelside turn). Always struck me as unsafe.
    This bothers me too when I'm passing a boarder who has his back to me.

    That being said, I have respect for those who are good snowboarders- watching some of the long-time riders shred Rumble is pretty impressive...
    Agree. I hate seeing boarders slide down a steep slope with the board 90 degrees to the slope scraping off all the snow. I do admire boarders who can carve.

  • So far, the most rude people I have had to deal with don't fall into a specific category of snowboarder or of skier. I deal a lot with the public as I try to ride the chair with skiers rather than patrollers (I see my job as an ambassador and also try my damnedest to stop people from taking selfies by skiing over and offering to take their photo for them) and I meet a lot, a LOT of very nice people who love to ski. 

    Who I do see are rude are in the lodge, where I really can't do anything about it as there's a staff to deal with that.  I don't envy their jobs. 

    Those who insist on reserving a table for the entire day when everyone is out skiing and they keep a place holder there for the table, or those who are anal explosive and scatter their gear, clothing and such all over the place, or those who permit their kids to scream and yell inside I consider to be rude. Also, those who are too lazy to pick up their skis in front of the lodge and put them on the rack and get them out of the travelway. I was hauling a toboggan in on Saturday and I had to maneuver with a full sled around all of the skis just left on the ground while other people tried to walk around them as well. Not cool. I might add that there were only skis on the ground, not snowboards. 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • I just saw a bumper sticker in Waterbury that said "No one cares if you ski Mad River Glen" 
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
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