3 New England ski resorts penalized for violating child labor law

Jiminy Peak, Cranmore Mountain Resort and Bromley Mountain Ski Resort. Fined $21.5k.
https://www.wcvb.com/article/3-new-england-ski-resorts-penalized-for-violating-child-labor-law/22748467
ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA

Comments

  • edited August 20
    I'm sure this is common. A close friend"s daughter worked almost every day this past season at a ski area in MA. (I'll leave it nameless). Between race training and teaching she was literally on the hill 7 days a week from Christmas week into March, unless time off was needed for ski trips north. Age 15. She didn't ever complain as $11/ per hour plus tips is pretty good for a high school sophmore doing what she loves!
  • That is a good wage and I could see why an area would lose track of someone working like that.
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • "youths working more than 8 hours on non-school days or more than 3 hours on school days, working past 7 p.m. during the school year and working more than 18 hours during a school week"

    First off when I think of violations of child labor laws I don't think about the kids at Bromley (my home mountain) working on the mountain, in a great environment, at a good wage, and (I have to assume) very much voluntarily.

    Secondly, when I was in high school I worked at a ski shop and violated all these rules. Happily. And I was no worse for it; in fact it instilled a strong work ethic that resulted in for instance being able to afford a 2nd home in SoVT!

    And finally, how many high school athletes would violate these rules if they were applied to sports? In suburban areas, ALL OF THEM!

    Unless there are some yet unheard stories of true abuse of child labor at these areas, I think the DOL should spend our tax dollars where there are serious child labor issues.
  • And finally, how many high school athletes would violate these rules if they were applied to sports? In suburban areas, ALL OF THEM!

    I agree with this totally. The amount of time I see kids spending at practice, especially sports like football, blows my mind. You know how many players even got close to the NFL from Central Vermont in the past 20 years? One-- that's it, one and now he's back at his old high school as a gym teacher and football coach. Yet, I hear the coaches talking and driving the kids like they're going to get scouted for the NFL tomorrow. They're games, that's all, games. A good work ethic can be taught without the sheer amount of time spent in this.
    "Making ski films is being irresponsible with other people's money, in a responsible sort of way..." 
    Greg Stump
  • I voluntarily worked more hours than that while instructing in high school.
    - Sam
  • So we're penalizing businesses for paying more than minimum wage, to people who want to work?

  • I have to believe that almost all states must have child labor laws. Not that I necessarily agree with them in all cases. Isn't one reason for this so companies will hire full time adult help instead of paying children a lower wage for the same job? Not sure I would tell people if I (the mtn) was breaking the law.
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • edited August 21

    So we're penalizing businesses for paying more than minimum wage, to people who want to work?

    In MA at least, these chldren are beng paid the minimum wage ($11 per hour) in most, if not all cases. Although I personally think it should be left to the parents, the focus of the law is that kids should be focused on schoolwork, on school days, rather than work. I believe this law only applies to kids 14 and 15 years old , at least in MA. And what kid really wants to work more than 8 hours on their day off?
  • edited August 22
    Chuckstah said:


    the focus of the law is that kids should be focused on schoolwork, on school days, rather than work.

    See the part about sports, above. Educators and bureaucrats are talking out of both sides of their mouths -- focus on schoolwork! Unless of course you can throw a football really well.

    And what about kids who strive to do vocational work? Should they struggle through algebra homework, even though they're never going to launch satellites? Wouldn't they be better off learning a trade from the ground up, so to speak?

    And based on the butchery of the English language I see these days, and the bizarre use of apostrophes, I assure you that most kids aren't spending their time reading literature.
    Chuckstah said:

    And what kid really wants to work more than 8 hours on their day off?

    I sure did, and I knew a lot of others. Somebody has to pay for all the programs that discourage people from taking responsibility and working.

    Of course I don't want to see kids taken advantage of. Of course I don't want to see sweatshops. And at the same time, I don't want to see the government tell kids they can't work, and penalize industries and businesses who move the economy forward safely and with a reasonable pay rate for kids.

  • That’s what I call a very clear, concise and reasonable argument. Motion denied. ;)
    ISNE-I Skied New England | NESAP-the New England Ski Area Project | SOSA-Saving Our Ski Areas - Location SW of Boston MA
  • Good points Rick. I'll just add that when I was in high school, back in the stone age, I also worked a lot, as did most of my friends. Being in a position for the last few decades where I need to hire inexpensive help, I can say that most youths no longer have a work ethic. And I always sucked at algebra. How did I end up an economics major?
  • ropeways.net | Home | 2018-08-23
    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INVESTIGATION RESULTS IN THREE NEW ENGLAND RESORTS CORRECTING CHILD LABOR VIOLATIONS AND PAYING PENALTY

    MANCHESTER, N.H. – Following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD), The Fairbank Group LLC will implement extensive corrective measures to resolve violations of the child labor requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and ensure future compliance at its three recreational resorts. The company has also paid a $21,582 penalty.

    WHD investigators found that the three resorts – Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort in Hancock, Massachusetts; Cranmore Mountain Resort in North Conway, New Hampshire; and Bromley Mountain Ski Resort in Peru, Vermont - employed a total of 44 minors, ages 14 or 15, outside of the hours restrictions for that age group required by the FLSA’s child labor provisions. Some youths worked more than 8 hours on non-school days, past 7 p.m. during the school year, or more than 3 hours on school days, while some worked more than 18 hours during a school week, all in excess of what the law allows.

    As part of a compliance agreement with WHD, the resorts will train supervisors and instruct minors on child labor requirements, use time clock software to ensure minors’ work hours stay within the limits prescribed by the law, and help supervisors better identify minors by providing them with special nametags or uniform labels. They will also appoint compliance directors to oversee minors’ employment activity at each resort.

    “This agreement demonstrates the Fairbank Group’s commitment to provide a safe and healthy on-the-job experience for the hundreds of young workers employed at its resorts,” said Wage and Hour Division Northern New England District Director Daniel Cronin.

    “We encourage employers to contact the Wage and Hour Division for assistance and to make use of the many tools we provide to help them understand the child labor and others laws and avoid violations,” said Wage and Hour Division District Director Carlos Matos, in Boston.

    WHD’s Northern New England District Office in Manchester, New Hampshire, and its Boston District Office conducted the investigation.
  • edited August 23
    Chuckstah said:

    Good points Rick. I'll just add that when I was in high school, back in the stone age, I also worked a lot, as did most of my friends. Being in a position for the last few decades where I need to hire inexpensive help, I can say that most youths no longer have a work ethic. And I always sucked at algebra. How did I end up an economics major?

    Well I just re-read my rant and wow do I sound like some grumpy old fart. Sheesh. Not walking it back, but I need to adopt a friendlier tone!

    My last thought, if Mr. Cronin and Mr. Matos are really so concerned about the welfare of the children who were so horribly abused in this case, I assume that the $21,582 is being distributed among the victims, yes?

  • See the part about sports, above. Educators and bureaucrats are talking out of both sides of their mouths -- focus on schoolwork! Unless of course you can throw a football really well.

    In high school, sports practice/game is usually no more than 2 hours a day, hardly a back breaker for time management. Two hours for sports is a lot different than working 8 hours after going to school.

    And what about kids who strive to do vocational work? Should they struggle through algebra homework, even though they're never going to launch satellites? Wouldn't they be better off learning a trade from the ground up, so to speak?

    Here in NJ, most counties have a vocational school. If votech students struggle with algebra, they are going to have bigger problems with almost any high paying vocation they choose to study.


    I sure did, and I knew a lot of others. Somebody has to pay for all the programs that discourage people from taking responsibility and working.

    Of course I don't want to see kids taken advantage of. Of course I don't want to see sweatshops. And at the same time, I don't want to see the government tell kids they can't work, and penalize industries and businesses who move the economy forward safely and with a reasonable pay rate for kids.

    High school kids can be easily taken advantage of by employers. That is why the laws exist. There have been problems in the past.

  • IF the kids at the ski areas were indeed taken advantage of (which I have doubts, but ok, perhaps Cranmore has a salt mine on the back side) then I am 100% in favor of the fines, as long as the money is distributed to the victims and not to some vague fund to pad the budgets for the bureaucrats.

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